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Computing

In recent years, computers and technology have become commonplace in all of our lives. The children we teach today, will grow up into a world that we cannot yet conceive due to the incredible speed at which technology is developing. Today, it is nearly impossible to exist without leaving a digital footprint, whether this be through online searching, messaging, video calling or social media use. 

 

At Tower Road Academy, we want our children to be masters of technology prepared with the knowledge to be able to harness its potential for creativity and collaboration. We want to develop children’s computational thinking and be able to use these logical processes to solve a wide range of problems, across all subjects.

 

In our curriculum, we will embed technology across all subjects, in order to develop the skills within the Information Technology strand ensuring our children can use devices effectively to enhance their learning. We will use a combination of devices and unplugged teaching to build upon existing Computer Science skills, ensuring our children have a firm understanding of how algorithms work and how to use debugging skills when appropriate to solve problems.

 

By utilising technology across a broad range of subject areas, we will create Digitally Literate students, who know how to use technology effectively and safely and how to protect their digital footprint. Our knowledge rich curriculum has clear progression across the key stages within the three strands of Computer Science, Information Technology, Digital Literacy and each year builds upon the knowledge gained from previous years.

 

Our children will leave Tower Road, confident, safe and competent users of technology, knowing how and when to use it to enhance their learning.

 

How will we implement technology at Tower Road?

 

Computing at Tower Road is designed to be progressive by way of revisiting prior knowledge and skills within the year and throughout the school years. This means the children can achieve greater depth in their knowledge and skills as they progress through school.

 

Consideration is given to how greater depth will be taught, learnt and demonstrated within each lesson, as well as how learners will be supported in line with the school’s commitment to inclusion.

 

Vocabulary linked to Computing will be clearly displayed within the learning environment and is referred to regularly to ensure children have a secure understanding of the concepts and 'real world' application for their skills. 

 

Technology is embedded across the curriculum, to demonstrate how it can enhance teaching and learning.

 

Retrieval of previously learned content is frequent and regular, supporting pupils to discriminate between topics and aiding long term memory.

 

Computational thinking is referred to in other subjects to enable children to solve problems in classrooms.

 

We use both computers and iPads, along with unplugged lessons, to explore and investigate as well as enabling children to gain ‘real life experiences’ to understand the real word application of the computational skills.

 

Embedding technology across the curriculum allows for regular discussions regarding e-safety and digital literacy, creating safe and competent users of the devices.

The Computing Curriculum

 

The primary Computing curriculum is split into three strands: Computer Science, Information Technology and Digital Literacy

 

 Computer Science is the study of coding and programming. Within this, we teach how to program physical devices (such as Beebots, Code-a-pillars and Microbits) as well as how to create our own digital games.

 

KS1 Computing Statements for Computer Science

  • Understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as program son digital devices; and tat programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions
  • Create and debug simple programs
  • Use logical reasoning to predict the behaviours or simple programs

 

KS2 Computing Statements for Computer Science

  • Design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts.
  • Use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output.
  • Use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs.
  • Understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration.
  • Use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content.

 

Information Technology is the use of digital devices to create and consume content. This includes (but is not limited to) word processing, website creation, audio and video editing.

 

KS1 Computing Statements for Information Technology

  • Use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content.

 

KS2 Computing Statements for Information Technology

 

  • Select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information.

 

Digital Literacy is the ability to use technology in a safe and competent way. This strand teaches the skills to be able to decide when technology is and is not appropriate to use, and also includes many of the e-safety aspects to ensure pupils know how to keep themselves safe online.

 

KS1 Computing Statements for Digital Literacy

  • Recognise common uses of information technology beyond school.
  • Use technology safely and respectfully keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about material on the internet or other online technologies.

 

KS2 Computing Statements for Digital Literacy

  • Understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration.
  • Use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content.
  • Use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.
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